7 Questions to Ask Every Client Before August 15

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Let’s play word association.

I say: “July or August

You say: “Vacations, people out, summertime” 

Top legal officers say: “Next year’s budgets, end of year results, and adjust for the 2nd half of the year”

Large clients are thinking about next year’s budget right now. Many have submitted their first drafts to management. Your clients are learning how their company’s 4th quarter will play out—and any changes in plans/priorities which may result. They are integrating the unplanned events which popped up earlier this year while predicting surprises yet to come. All in addition to their day jobs.

This is your chance.

Engage your clients by asking questions and providing answers. Offer perspective on the budget trends you see at other clients—are they flat, headed up, or headed down? These insights are valued and hard to come by. Clients use your insight to manage their management and their budgets. Here are the questions we find most effective: 

1.       When do you submit your 2019 budget?
2.       Are you working on your 2019 budget? (If already submitted—how was it received, do you need to make any changes?)
3.       How is your budget performance looking for this year?
4.       What were the big surprises this year?
5.       What do you think they will be next year?  
6.       Are there any changes in management pressures or goals for the second half of the year?
7.       What can I do to help you meet your year-end goal?  

And maybe don’t ask the last question—act instead. Offer the following:

-        Help triage priorities for the year
-        A 2nd-year associate to help with leg work
-        Perspective on changes your clients are making to headcount, AFAs, technology, and training

The really bold can offer up some fixed fees for specified portions of your client’s caseload or work in the new year.

Summer is one of the best times to start locking in future work and help where clients need it now.

MBR

New, Classic, Light, and Heavy Summer Reading—All with Lasting Lessons

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Summer reading can be a light or a serious read. I recommend a selection from each for summer reading—a light and short and maybe something longer when you are done. My selections include:

Leonardo da Vinci by Walter Isaacson

Learn all about creativity and a great mind. See how a genius thinks about the world and thinks in general. See how he relentlessly pursues answers to satisfy his curiosity and how he procrastinates. Learn how he manages not to create boundaries to limit his thinking.

How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci: Seven Steps to Genius Every Day by Michael J. Gelb

Mr. Gelb, who is also an excellent presenter, offers practical insight into being more creative and what holds us back. He suggests strategies such as focusing on questions instead of answers and how to eliminate the constraints of outcomes to encourage creative and more original thinking.

In the lighter category, I highly recommend a read or re-read of:

Who Moved My Cheese? by Spencer Johnson, M.D.

This highly readable book can be digested in an hour or so. 2 mice and 2 people deal with change, complacency, contentment, and the obstacles to change—presented as a story about the different approaches to the dwindling cheese supply. Amusing and thought-provoking, this book is about to celebrate its 20th anniversary. It spent 5 years on the New York Times best seller list.

And, a set of summer reading recommendations would not be complete without:

The Mad Clientist’s ABCs of Client Service by Michael Rynowecer

This fully illustrated book is a light-hearted look at a deadly serious skill: learning how to improve client service. The Mad Clientist distilled 14,000 in-depth interviews with top executives into 26 pithy, pointed actions for you to start using today. Spend just 26 minutes with The Mad Clientist and his ABCs of Client Service and improve your client service immediately.

Clientelligence: How Superior Client Relationships Fuel Growth and Profits by Michael Rynowecer

Learn how to drive growth and develop the best relationships with clients—based on in-depth research with 14,000 top decision makers who hire professional services firms. The decision makers point to 17 activities described within Clientelligence as driving superior client relationships, service, and new business.

Learn and enjoy.

MBR