The 4 Biggest Client Service Turkeys of 2017

Turkeys 2018-01.png

Next week we will give thanks for all our good fortune. This week, The Mad Clientist gives thanks for all we can learn from the most egregious acts of client service. While these may provide a few laughs, they also provide insight into how clients think about their interactions and their experience—and why they appreciate superior client service.

Sure I Have Time for an Important Update—or—Whoops, I Have to Go

My law firm called and asked me if I had time for some important updates on my case. I said of course and settled in for the unscheduled call. They promptly started giving me a very detailed briefing on what appeared to be delicate issues in a matter which was not ours. I told them this wasn’t my case. Then—they simply said they “had to go” and hung up.

— As shared by the General Counsel of a leading pharmaceutical company

My Attorney Really Hit It Off with Opposing Counsel

I decided to give one of our newer law firms a complex but manageable case after they lobbied hard for more work. We had a good kick-off meeting—I felt they understood my key concern about risk and the need to contain the other side with language I wanted them to develop. They performed the work well.

The lead lawyer called me and asked if the partner who performed the work did a good job. I was immediately impressed—they had never asked for feedback before. I told the lead lawyer his firm did a good job. I’ll always remember—his next words were: “Then you wouldn’t mind if the lawyer who performed the work teamed with opposing counsel to work on a matter together at a nonprofit in which both attorneys have an interest—because the 2 attorneys really hit it off.”

— Shared with me during an in–depth interview with a partner at a private equity firm

My Accounting Department Won’t Let Me

“One my new goals was to provide better reporting to top management,” explains the Deputy General Counsel of a global bank, “I met with my partner at the firm who does the bulk of our litigation. I took the most recent invoice the firm sent me and marked it up with comments to show the changes I needed in order to be able to prepare my reports. He listened and acknowledged what I said. The next invoice came through and it looked just like all the other bills. No changes I could see. I sent my partner an email asking what happened. Two days passed and I had no response to my email. I called and left a message. We talked a day later at which point my partner explained he would investigate. Again no response until I called him a couple of days later. My partner told me: “my accounting department won’t let me make the changes you want.” I had to wonder to myself how he would stand up to my adversaries if he wouldn’t stand up to his own accounting department.

— As explained by the Deputy General Counsel for Litigation of a global bank

I Know the CEO

One of the attorneys (at Law Firm X) was so obnoxious that we actually told the firm we would only work with certain attorneys and not this particular attorney on any of our cases. He is very rude and abrasive. But we didn't hold this against the firm because there are so many very good attorneys there. He actually went behind our backs to complain about us to our CEO. After that, no one trusted him, not even our CEO, who asked that the firm never work on any of our cases again.

— Detailed by the EVP/General Counsel of a large power generation company

The moral of these stories: Don’t be a turkey—gobble gobble.

Happy Thanksgiving!

MBR

How The BTI Client Service 30 Outperforms Everyone Else

This week The Mad Clientist shares 6 key things The BTI Client Service 30 do to outperform their competition and deliver the very best client service to their clients—and potential clients.

You can view the video below, or on YouTube directly here: https://youtu.be/JPw-5twKjSM

We’ll be releasing videos here on The Mad Clientist blog every Tuesday. Subscribe today (in the box at the upper right of your screen) and be sure you don't miss a single one.

Unspoken Criteria Clients Use to Evaluate Your RFP

Shh-02-01.png

Clients are becoming much more skilled in evaluating law firms. They are on the lookout for clues as to what they will get once they hire a firm. Top legal decision makers see so many pitches and presentations they have now developed a clear set of criteria—some of which they share—and some not.

Lack of sharing is neither a trick nor negligence—its client preferences which have become ingrained in their thinking. Clients think about some especially important requirements so often they believe the proposing firms know what these unspoken requirements are.

Other unstated criteria are not yet fully developed but clients know them when they see them—these are the most dangerous—because clients still have an expectation you will meet these unstated criteria.

Our continuing in-depth interviews with top legal decision makers and influencers reveal the following unstated criteria law firms are expected to meet:

  • Talk about client working styles and preference. Law firms are asking clients about their working styles especially around communication, managing to tight timelines, and the types of outreach clients find helpful. One top legal officer of a global consumer products company said, “These questions show they know there may be moments of urgency and plan for it. These firms have been there. I think it’s great they ask what it’s like to work with us—it’s a gutsy question.”
     
  • Asking clients about their experiences with AFAs. Even though clients report most law firms are still AFA averse—they expect you to not only be conversant in AFAs—but they want you to lead the discussion. AFA-savvy law firms are asking clients about their experiences with AFAs and making suggestions to help their potential client gain more value.
     
  • Willingness to go off script. Clients want advisors and are bringing up current problems and issues to see how law firms respond. Clients look for firms who share opinions, ideas, and discussion—and avoid the firms who hesitate, or worse, decline. “If they can’t speak about something I think is in their wheelhouse, I get more than a little unnerved,” says a top legal executive at a very large bank.
     
  • Online dashboards to manage budgets, progress, and store documents. These add so much value to clients, as one GC puts it, “The firms without a dashboard get put at the bottom of the pile.”

The winning law firms prepare and train for each of these unannounced criteria. They practice the pitch, list out the questions they might be asked, and go in knowing they’ll get unexpected questions. And, the winning firms are already thinking about what clients may be adding to the unspoken criteria list moving forward.

MBR

3 Techniques to Build Stronger Client Relationships--Part 2: Setting Client Expectations

Setting client expectations is all about eliminating surprises for your client. BTI Principal Jennifer Dezso shares 11 prompts for attorneys to use to help set client expectations, AND describe the value they provide, showcase their experience, and keep everyone moving toward meeting the same objectives.

You can view the video by clicking the image below, or on YouTube directly here: https://youtu.be/vCXmeUWi2z0

View Part 1 Here

With this series we’ll be taking an in-depth look at a wide range of client relationship best practices. We’ll be releasing Client Relationship Lab webisodes on our blog every month—subscribe today (in the box at the upper right of your screen) and be sure you don't miss a single one.

Law Firms to Add Big to Marketing Budgets in 2018—Here’s How to Get Yours

Coins in Jars-01.png

13% of law firm CMOs are trying to hide their smiles. They snagged big increases in their budgets—just over $1 million per firm.* Their goal is simple—keeping clients, growing clients, and getting new ones. Their success in justifying their new budgets comes from emphasizing the risk of not spending the money. They made the elusive risk of opportunity cost real by:

  • Presenting a detailed year-over-year growth analysis of each major client going back 3 to 5 years, highlighting the clients where revenue is static or has slipped. These CMOs calculated the lost revenue as a percent of total revenue, and a few estimated lost profits. Each CMO analyzed at least 50 clients and some more than 100.
  • Calculating total new business developed per partner and per attorney over time. These CMOs were careful not to track names but wanted to show their firm was either becoming more or less productive in developing business.
  • Using strategically designed client feedback to uncover how often the firm is considered (or more importantly not considered) for new work—using the outcome to estimate new business sitting on the table—and the cost of not winning the work.
  • Surveying firm partners asking them to assess their own business development prowess and probing for the obstacles preventing improvement. In almost every case you end up with low self-evaluation of skills and many obstacles to success. This is your business development training outline and justification—especially when you present your results in conjunction with the client retention and business development productivity in the bullets above.

The Real Secret to Adding Big

The budget gains are based on way more than good analysis alone. The CMOs have been working on their efforts for 2 years or more. They sought out advice and counsel from friendly partners and were evangelists for their cause—able to preach at every available moment without crossing the line to being a pain. They lobbied hard within the firm. And, these CMOs presented the needs in digestible chunks which all fit neatly into a strategic framework when put together.

The budget increasing CMOs jumped all over their firm’s strategic planning process. They made their voice heard so it could not be ignored—trying to own as much of the process as possible—even if it meant working outside the process and feeding their thoughts and data to key partners.

What’s Happening to the Rest of the Marketing and Business Development Budgets

Overall, the legal marketing budget outlook is stable and continues a very slow path forward. The typical law firm will spend 2.53% of firm revenue on marketing and business development up from 2.5% of revenue in 2017. This is an almost stunning contrast to the law firms making the big investments.

The pace of change is slow. But as long as a measurable number of firms change their approach to investing in business development—everyone else has to worry. And the firms boosting their budgets have to execute while the race for clients throttles up a little bit more.

MBR

*This new research is based on more than 159 in-depth interviews with law firm marketing leaders conducted from May 1, 2017 to October 20, 2017.

Inward vs. Outward Innovation: What Your Clients Want from Your Firm

Inwardly motivated innovation and outwardly motivated innovation can lead to very different outcomes for your firm. The Mad Clientist shows how client-recognized innovation improves your firm's bottom line.

You can view the video below, or on YouTube directly here: https://youtu.be/RfBwPIS6QPs

We’ll be releasing videos here on The Mad Clientist blog every Tuesday. Subscribe today (in the box at the upper right of your screen) and be sure you don't miss a single one.

Separating Fact from Fiction: Why Attorneys Are Never Responsive Enough

Clock-01.png

Your clients think in terms of minutes and hours when looking for responses to their questions. Just over 80% of clients expect an immediate response to their texts and emails. Immediate, in their minds, means 1 to 2 hours*.

The majority of calls to attorneys are prompted by a question or issue posed to your client. Think about your client’s boss, a C-level executive colleague, or business unit leader who wants an answer to an important question your client doesn’t have. And, these colleagues want answers when they ask—not hours later.

Your client wants to be the problem solver—not the source of delay. So they want answers from you now. Your client’s response is in full public view at their organization—their colleagues are acutely aware of how long it takes to answer their question.

Attorney’s Immediate Is 2x as Long as Client’s Immediate

Lawyers routinely think of their client response time in 4- to 8-hour blocks. Between all their commitments, court dates, filing deadlines and a consistent stream of client inquiries, most attorneys see 4 to 8 hours as appropriate. This is twice what clients expect, as we learned from our work in developing client service standards and related initiatives with law firms.

You can close this gap immediately and move your response with little disruption to your routine—big time rainmakers and BTI Client Service All-Stars rely on these techniques to make clients unflinching in their belief you are always immediate and helpful in your response. We recommend:

  1. Asking clients about their preferred response time. You will learn exactly what your client thinks is reasonable by asking directly, which may change their expectation and boost your client service.
  2. Agreeing to have your client identify truly urgent issues in their outreach.
  3. Leaving a detailed out-of-office message or voicemail which states how long you will be out—and more importantly—when you will be back or checking messages. (Clients tell us they are infuriated by open ended messages which merely state you are out of the office.)
  4. Ensuring your assistant and anyone answering your phone can communicate when you will be available and when you will be checking messages.
  5. For your very best clients—letting them know in advance if you will be hard to reach and sharing your plans for availability.

The good news is you can pause the response time clock by letting clients know when they will hear from you. Once clients know, they can manage their own situation and look like everything is under control. You may still have to rush to get an answer but at least your client will be smiling.

MBR

*Based on BTI research conducted on a rolling basis between February 2017 and September 2017. BTI conducted more than 325 independent, individual interviews with CLOs and General Counsel at Fortune 1000 companies and large organizations.

The Value Equation Cheat Sheet: Delivering Superior Value

Delivering superior value to your clients isn't only about doing more than what's expected of you. With this Value Equation Cheat Sheet, Jennifer Dezso shows you how to talk about value with clients so their decision to hire you isn’t solely based on price.

You can view the video below, or on YouTube directly here: https://youtu.be/D_Ccko9C2wA

We’ll be releasing videos here on The Mad Clientist blog every Tuesday. Subscribe today (in the box at the upper right of your screen) and be sure you don't miss a single one.

Clients Find New Money to Send to Outside Law Firms

Found Money in Couch-01v2-01.png

Follow the money. The money will always tell you the story.

This money is going back to outside counsel. Flying right into the face of conventional thinking after 7 years of watching clients bring work in house—it’s going right back out again to outside law firms. But, how it’s going and to whom, is as different as ever.

Where Will the Money Come From?

Top legal decision makers are able to keep balanced budgets despite using high-priced outside counsel by using new budget and buying strategies. Clients are able to buy more services for the same dollars with the help of their new Chief Legal Operating Officers. This new group is already helping to buy smarter and get more outside counsel for the buck.

In addition to CLOO savings, large clients continue to embrace AFAs—with fixed fees being the arrangement of choice. General Counsel are also using the savings from the large number of settlements they reached (litigation settlements hit a record in 2017) to fund their newfound spending with outside counsel. And clients have only started to push hard on these fronts.

Clients are picking and choosing their law firms based on their enthusiasm and prowess in these buying strategies. Any sign of law firm resistance, even if unintended, will make your firm look much less attractive than those embracing the new way of GC living.

Our research with top legal decision makers shows this shift has been in the making for the past 18 months.

Your success in winning some of the largest surge of new work to hit the market in 10 years is equally dependent on 3 factors: 1) the new buying strategies; 2) positioning your firm to grab this work before clients think about issuing RFPS; and 3) other law firms getting there first. This means targeting business plans to get to these clients fast to talk to about plans for 2018, challenges, and new ways of doing business. Here are some suggestions for moving forward:

Growth in 15 Practices

Growth returns to almost every major practice. Clients tell us the increased need for outside counsel is broad based with litigation, labor and employment issues, tax, trade, and regulatory issues all commanding significant and strategic attention—all due to more complexity and uncertainty. This translates into the following:

  • IP Litigation, Regulatory, and M&A which will enjoy between 7% and 10% growth
  • Class Actions and Private Equity are right behind with growth between 5% and 7%
  • 8 more practices are targeted for increases as well
  • Only 3 will decline

Big Legal Clients Leading the Charge

Clients in the largest spending industries are leading the move to use outside counsel more with 3 of the 4 largest industries planning growth for up to 11 practices. These include the following trendsetting industry sectors:

  • The Health Care industry plans to increase spending in 11 different practice areas—showing the broadest need
  • Pharmaceutical clients plan for increased need in 10 separate practice areas
  • Banking and Financial Services organizations plan to increase spending in 9 practices

The Flat Market for Outside Counsel Spending Is Officially Dead (At Least for Now)

Corporate counsel can’t scale their departments fast enough to meet the needs of the increasingly complex work coming in the door. They also want to tap a broader range of skills than they can keep on staff. This is a fundamental change in their approach from the last 6 years. Overall, clients plan to move $3 billion of in-house budget to outside law firms in 2018.

You can pinpoint where each and every practice will grow and command higher rates in the newly released BTI Practice Outlook 2018: Changes, Trends and Opportunities for Law Firms.

MBR

How Client Focus Can Go So Wrong

Focus-01.png

The quest for the best solution can make even the most savvy, thoughtful professional tone deaf.

Clients think of client focus as you working towards meeting their targeted objective, which may or may not be the perfect solution. 70% of lawyers define client focus as coming up with the best possible solution. And while clients can appreciate this, if the solution doesn’t meet their specific needs, it is a failure.

You can argue both clients and their lawyers are essentially saying, “do what’s best,” but the distinction is in who gets to decide what’s best. The search for the perfect answer often drowns out a client’s targeted outcome. You can see this clearly in the true story below:

World Law enjoyed a strong relationship with long-term client, Sweet Tech Corp, where billings averaged just over $20 million annually. The senior partner at World Law, Lou, was preparing to retire. As the primary contact with Sweet Tech, he openly shared his retirement plans with Sweet Tech’s CEO, Jason. To ease the transition and ensure work was not interrupted, Jason requested a succession and transition plan from World Law.

World Law conducted an exhaustive internal search. Lou, the retiring partner, developed a job specification sheet including technical skills, interpersonal aspects, personal chemistry, and communication style. The firm set up a committee to vet the potential candidates. After a thorough matching of skills and assessment of availability, World Law decided upon Gus as the logical successor to Lou. Lou immediately began incorporating Gus into the relationship—training him on all the processes, bringing him to client meetings, and sharing all the nuances of Sweet Tech one builds from a long-time relationship.

Within the year, Lou retired and Gus took the reins.

6 months later, Jason at Sweet Tech called the managing partner of World Law. Jason was not happy with Gus. Jason acknowledged Gus’s technical prowess, but there were numerous chemistry and personality issues eroding the previously strong relationship. Jason expressed respect for Gus and the value World Law brought, but requested a new partner be assigned to manage Sweet Tech’s account.

World Law responded quickly. The managing partner went to meet with Sweet Tech to demonstrate concern and understand Jason’s every concern and suggestion. World Law initiated a new search.

After several weeks of new partner analysis, the firm reached what it thought was an insightful and telling observation—Gus was in fact the right partner for Jason and Sweet Tech Corp. Every piece of objective evidence—from his location, expertise, past experience, and even understanding of Sweet Tech’s operations—supported Gus remaining as partner.

World Law’s managing partner, Barbara, took Jason to an outstanding lunch—wonderful food, great view, and the restaurant’s well-known power table. Barbara thanked Jason for being such a long-time client and shared the firm’s view on how important Sweet Tech is to World Law. Jason was feeling reassured and sensed he would soon be enjoying a relationship with a new partner. At one point, Jason thought he would be invited in to interview potential partners.

But suddenly, Jason felt empty. He was stunned. World Law was recommending Gus remain as the partner in charge of the relationship. Barbara explained how Gus met every criterion and was clearly up to the task. In World Law’s opinion, Gus was the best partner for Sweet Tech Corp.

Jason politely shared his disbelief and suggested the firm reassess the assignment. Barbara reiterated she was acting in best interest of Sweet Tech Corp.

Jason thanked Barbara for her time and effort. He went back to his office to develop a transition plan to work with one of the 8 other law firms on his roster.

Jason’s targeted outcome was a new relationship partner. This 100-year-old, 1,000-lawyer firm was so focused on the perfect solution they missed the core issue—Jason and his team couldn’t work with Gus.

But maybe the real lesson is different—when a mega client likes your firm enough to tell you they want a new relationship partner—their goal is clear and your only answer is an unequivocal yes.

**********

This excerpt is just a snippet from my best-selling book Clientelligence: How Superior Client Relationships Fuel Growth and Profits. Already in use at over 150 law firms, the 17 activities within Clientelligence are proven drivers of superior client relationships. Based on 14,000 in-depth interviews with clients, this consistent and systematic approach to developing superior client service skills gives you unparalleled access to your clients' most complex—and premium-rate—work.

I hope you’ll take a moment to learn more about how you can use these activities to create and maintain superior client relationships of your own while fueling growth and profits—or order your copy—here.

MBR

Building Activity-Based Client Service Metrics

Aligning partner objectives with client service metrics changes the effectiveness of client service standards for the better. The Mad Clientist shares 3 of the activity-based metrics top-performing firms use to help you get started.

You can view the video below, or on YouTube directly here: https://youtu.be/OR2fW4roNMw

We’ll be releasing videos here on The Mad Clientist blog every Tuesday. Subscribe today (in the box at the upper right of your screen) and be sure you don't miss a single one.

Exactly When, Where and How the Big 4 Will Steal Your Firm’s Best Clients

PWC Building-01.png

PwC is out to steal your clients. They just told you so.

PwC, through its legal arm, ILC Legal, has formally announced its intentions to open its US office. ILC indicated it will “wait to see how the market reacts” to decide its future plans—we interpret this comment to mean: How many clients can they sign up and how fast?

And, by extension, the remaining 3 of the Big 4 accounting firms can’t be far behind.

This is more than a wake up call or point of observation—it is a rare defining moment. This is also the kick in the pants any organization would see as a screaming voice for change. The nature of competition has changed. Law firms will be competing against a new beast who has already been through the changes law firms need to make to be winners.

The Big 4 accounting firms faced the same issues as law firms face today—about 30 years ago. At the time, I spent a decade working for PwC predecessor firm Coopers & Lybrand and helped to implement their changes to make client service the top priority, rivaled only by business development. This included training in business development and working across practices and offices, selling multiple services to a single client, going to market by industry, segregating high priority pursuits from others and using partners with skills to land these prized clients, and harnessing the power of finding the right partners at the right time to win big-time work.

They figured it all out and haven’t looked back since.

The last time BTI measured (by interviewing more than 300 CFOs, CAOs, and other top financial executives a few years ago) we found:

  • PwC has the best client service of the Big 4
  • 58% of clients recommend PwC to a peer (the highest of the Big 4); for comparison - only 31% of clients recommend their primary law firm to a peer
  • PwC has a highly developed business development process designed to identify the strategic nature of potential clients, locate the right partners in terms of chemistry, industry and skills, and talk business issues to win big, sophisticated clients
  • Clients report PwC partners work collaboratively across the globe; clients say the majority of law firms don’t work collaboratively within their own firms
  • PwC was the first to develop the paperless audit—inventing new ways to use technology
  • PwC’s thought leadership is considered to be one of the gold standards
  • PwC plays hard and plays to win big

All of this is already built into the fabric of ILC Legal and will change the business development and client service rules in the legal industry.

The best clients will be the first to go on ILC’s target list. And your new competitor(s) will be playing by different rules. The most dangerous part will be in how this all plays out. No client will hand over all their work to ILC. The shift will unfold one assignment at a time and be hard to notice until it’s too late.

But, every law firm can still take steps to protect their clients and make it harder for ILC, or anyone else, to encroach on and poach your clients. Here is what we recommend you do about it, now:

Develop a Meaningful Client Retention Plan

Identify what the firm would do if you learned a client was thinking of shifting work elsewhere. Who would lead the charge? Exactly what steps would you take? The steps include intense client feedback, coaching from top rainmakers and consultants, changes in the team, adopting client service standards for these mega clients who might be defecting, forming a dedicated client team and meeting quarterly to discuss progress internally, and talking to clients semiannually to check progress. The sooner you start taking the steps, the less likely your clients will defect.

Get Deep, Meaningful Client Feedback

Not client satisfaction feedback, but performance feedback—and, the type of feedback which reveals how your clients want you to perform. Clients view performance improvement as equal to/or more important than understanding their goals—because if you can’t improve, you can’t meet their goals. And, they will never be satisfied.

The winning firms are getting feedback from their:

  • Largest and most important clients
  • Large clients where you do only a limited amount of work
  • Large clients (as measured by client revenue) where your fees have flat lined or declined
  • Clients where they have a new GC

Implement Your Client Teams Now

Dedicate your most skilled and high potential resources to care for, look after and grow client relationships on a long-term basis well beyond the current case. Make the leaders accountable for a robust business development plan and give them the budget they need to keep your clients for years, if not decades.

Train Partners in Business Development and Client Service

Most partners in law firms readily admit business development is their biggest weakness. And you can’t develop business without superior client service. The Big 4 are decades ahead of law firms in establishing business development and client service cultures. The firms unable to beat the Big 4 back with superior client service and business development are already at a disadvantage.

You can start changing now—and see business development skills, and client service soar in less than a year with the right training.

While there is more you can do, the steps above are game changers for most law firms. Follow these recommendations with the same zeal as you track and bill time and you will be ready for battle with any firm—Big 4 affiliate or not.

You battle the Big 4 (and other law firms) on the client-facing front lines of competition. The law firms who make the investments now and build these skills into their culture will leave all others behind—some far behind. Few industries get a wake-up call announcing one of the final chances to change is upon them. No firm serving medium to large clients is immune.

BTI has successfully helped our clients work through and accelerate the pace of change and improvement—at the Big 4 Accounting Firms as well as the law firms wanting to keep pace and even move ahead. We can help you with any or all of these recommendations—I welcome your call to discuss what this would look like for you and your firm. Reach me at mrynowecer@bticonsulting.com.

MBR

What Clients Really Expect from Attorneys—Part 1: Understanding What Clients Want

Not meeting client objectives can leave clients feeling dissatisfied as much, if not more than, the results of the legal outcome. Understanding what your clients want from the very beginning of a matter can affect the success or failure of your client relationship.

Jennifer Dezso, BTI Principal, shares one of the most effective client and matter management tools with step-by-step tactics to help you meet all of your client’s objectives.

You can view the video by clicking the image below, or on YouTube directly here: https://youtu.be/O7EUON74Va4

With this series we’ll be taking an in-depth look at a wide range of client relationship best practices. We’ll be releasing Client Relationship Lab webisodes on our blog every month—subscribe today (in the box at the upper right of your screen) and be sure you don't miss a single one.

Is Poor Matter Management Putting Your Client Relationships at Risk?

Clients want project management from their legal providers and it's clear they are not receiving it. When clients mention issues with poor project management they are focused on 4 core areas: staffing, timelines, budgeting & billing, and changes in scope. See how setting and managing client expectations in these areas can be a true differentiator for law firms. 

You can view the video below, or on YouTube directly here: https://youtu.be/eDOOamFLulQ

We’ll be releasing videos here on The Mad Clientist blog every Tuesday. Subscribe today (in the box at the upper right of your screen) and be sure you don't miss a single one.

Litigation Powerhouses: The Law Firms Leading the Litigation Market

2018 Litigation Powerhouses and Standouts-01.png

As litigation (of all types) continues to become more complex, corporate counsel turn to law firms they know and trust—and can sell to their leadership with little debate. The Powerhouse and Standout law firms in the links below are the ones corporate counsel tell us they are turning to for their most pressing litigation needs in 2018.

The IP Litigation Outlook: The Powerhouse and Standout Law Firms

Why GCs are Hiring:

IP litigation is spreading to a broader range of industries as technology permeates more and more products.

The Class Actions Outlook: The Powerhouse and Standout Law Firms

Why GCs are Hiring:

Clients report any news or allegation of even potential wrongdoing is resulting in class action suits against them.

The Complex Labor and Employment Litigation Outlook: The Powerhouse and Standout Law Firms

Why GCs are Hiring:

Clients are acutely sensitive to large-scale labor-related issues turning into expensive and highly public issues—the kind which can sour class actions and attract the attention of regulators.

The Product Liability Litigation Outlook: The Powerhouse and Standout Law Firms

Why GCs are Hiring:

Clients are reevaluating who and what types of firms they want to use as the nature of Product Liability claims undergoes a fundamental change.

The Complex Commercial Litigation Outlook: The Powerhouse and Standout Law Firms

Why GCs are Hiring:

Clients point to the growing complexity of the relationships within their supply chain spurring sensitive, complex, and potentially large claims.

Learn more about how your firm can take advantage of how client behavior and spending is changing for 2018—and what your firm can do to adapt, in the new BTI Litigation Outlook 2018: Changes, Trends and Opportunities for Law Firms, available now.

The Complex Commercial Litigation Outlook for 2018

Litigation Outlook Logo 2018-01.png

Commercial litigation reverses a 5-year slump and picks up more planned spending. CLOs point to the growing complexity of the relationships within their supply chain spurring sensitive, complex, and potentially large claims. In addition, we hear about indemnity claims growing in the financial world while companies generally seem to be more comfortable in initiating large-scale claims than they have in the past 5 years.

Join us in recognizing the following firms clients consider the real Powerhouses & Standouts in Complex Commercial litigation in the just-released BTI Litigation Outlook 2018:

Complex Commercial Litigation Powerhouses 2018

Cooley
Davis Polk
Dentons
DLA Piper
Jones Day
Kirkland & Ellis
Latham & Watkins
Skadden

Complex Commercial Litigation Standouts 2018

Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld
Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer
Baker McKenzie
BakerHostetler
Cravath, Swaine & Moore
Dechert
Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson
Gibson Dunn
Hogan Lovells
Jenner & Block
K&L Gates
McDermott Will & Emery
McGuireWoods
Morgan Lewis
Paul, Weiss
Pillsbury
Polsinelli
Sullivan & Cromwell
Wachtell Lipton

The Product Liability Litigation Outlook for 2018

Litigation Outlook Logo 2018-01.png

Clients facing Product Liability actions report larger claims in a broader array of industries. A growing number of companies are selling their products on a global scale—meaning exponentially more customers using their products. Meaning exponentially more customers are exposed to potential product-related issues, providing more opportunity for plaintiff’s counsel to identify Product Liability cases—which can quickly result in a class action.

Clients are reevaluating who and what types of firms they want to use as the nature of Product Liability claims undergoes a fundamental change. As the market sorts itself out, clients point to the following law firms as the Product Liability Powerhouses & Standouts in the just-released BTI Litigation Outlook 2018:

Product Liability Litigation Powerhouses 2018

Cooley
Dentons
Jones Day
Latham & Watkins
Skadden

Product Liability Litigation Standouts 2018

Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer
Baker McKenzie
Cleary Gottlieb
Cravath, Swaine & Moore
Davis Polk
Dechert
DLA Piper
Gibson Dunn
Greenberg Traurig
Hogan Lovells
K&L Gates
Kirkland & Ellis
Morgan Lewis
Paul, Weiss
Pillsbury
Reed Smith
Sullivan & Cromwell
Wachtell Lipton

The Complex Labor and Employment Litigation Outlook for 2018

Litigation Outlook Logo 2018-01.png

The complex segment of Labor and Employment keeps getting ever more complex. Clients are acutely sensitive to large-scale labor-related issues turning into expensive and highly public issues—the kind which can sour class actions and attract the attention of regulators. These issues demand client teams and client insight. Clients also see a growing group of law firms looking to carve out their place the Labor and Employment segment.

Please congratulate the following firms for earning the distinction of being named the Complex Labor and Employment Powerhouses & Standouts in the just-released BTI Litigation Outlook 2018:

Complex Employment Litigation Powerhouses 2018

Cooley
Dentons
Jones Day
Latham & Watkins
Littler
Morgan Lewis
Ogletree Deakins
Skadden

Complex Employment Litigation Standouts 2018

Baker McKenzie
BakerHostetler
Cleary Gottlieb
Cravath, Swaine & Moore
Davis Polk
Dechert
DLA Piper
Fisher Phillips
Gibson Dunn
Hogan Lovells
Jackson Lewis
Jenner & Block
K&L Gates
Kirkland & Ellis
Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel
McDermott Will & Emery
Norton Rose Fulbright
O’Melveny
Paul, Weiss
Pillsbury
Polsinelli
Sullivan & Cromwell
Wachtell Lipton
Weil

Changing Your Law Firm's Culture to Drive Growth

The Mad Clientist shares how embedding a client-focused mindset in your firm can change the culture, and drive business development. 

You can view the video below, or on YouTube directly here: https://youtu.be/p0-OxMMxdnw

We’ll be releasing videos here on The Mad Clientist blog every Tuesday. Subscribe today (in the box at the upper right of your screen) and be sure you don't miss a single one.